Dum Spiro, Spero

While I Breathe, I Hope

mini-girlz:

Headless Aphrodite
Clay figurine (3rd BCE) 
From Mount Carmel 
Israel Museum (IDAM), Jerusalem, Israel

via > lessingimages.com

mini-girlz:

Headless Aphrodite

Clay figurine (3rd BCE)

From Mount Carmel 


Israel Museum (IDAM), Jerusalem, Israel

via > lessingimages.com

artofthedarkages:

“Alexandria Mosaic”
A city mosaic depicting the Byzantine city of Alexandria in Egypt, a major intellectual and religious center. The city is fortified and abstracted to include only major buildings, particularly churches. The use of depth and perspective is jumbled and flat. Labelled in Greek.
Pieced together with limestone tesserae.
Made in 531 at the Early Byzantine town of Gerasa in Jordan and used as a floor mosaic at the Church of St. John. Currently held at the Jerash Museum.

artofthedarkages:

Alexandria Mosaic

A city mosaic depicting the Byzantine city of Alexandria in Egypt, a major intellectual and religious center. The city is fortified and abstracted to include only major buildings, particularly churches. The use of depth and perspective is jumbled and flat. Labelled in Greek.

Pieced together with limestone tesserae.

Made in 531 at the Early Byzantine town of Gerasa in Jordan and used as a floor mosaic at the Church of St. John. Currently held at the Jerash Museum.

(via medievalart)

centuriespast:

J. Pascal Sébah (Turkish, active late 19th century), Pyramide Cheops - Entrée (Entrance to the Pyrmaid of Cheops), ca. 1873/1878, albumen silver print,
Portland Art Museum

centuriespast:

J. Pascal Sébah (Turkish, active late 19th century), Pyramide Cheops - Entrée (Entrance to the Pyrmaid of Cheops), ca. 1873/1878, albumen silver print,

Portland Art Museum

medievalpoc:

Anonymous (South Italy)
Astrological Treatise
Italy (c. 1240s)
Illumination on Parchment, 275 x 190 mm.
Paris, Bibliothèque nationale., Département des Manuscrits.
Illumination. Astrological treatise translated by Herman of Dalmatia after the Introductorium by Albumasar (87 fols.), fol. 6 sup v : First decan of Aries
The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

medievalpoc:

Anonymous (South Italy)

Astrological Treatise

Italy (c. 1240s)

Illumination on Parchment, 275 x 190 mm.

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale., Département des Manuscrits.

Illumination. Astrological treatise translated by Herman of Dalmatia after the Introductorium by Albumasar (87 fols.), fol. 6 sup v : First decan of Aries

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

(via medievalart)

centuriespast:

Antonio Beato (British, born Italy, active Egypt, ca. 1825-ca. 1903), Pylone et Temple (Pylon, Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt), ca. 1865, albumen silver print
Portland Art Museum

centuriespast:

Antonio Beato (British, born Italy, active Egypt, ca. 1825-ca. 1903), Pylone et Temple (Pylon, Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt), ca. 1865, albumen silver print

Portland Art Museum

ancientpeoples:

Personal Ornament
1700-1500 BC
Minoan
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Personal Ornament

1700-1500 BC

Minoan

(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Phiale
c.500-470 BC
Attic 
Two friezes, the inner one representing a hare-hunt: Four hounds running at full speed to right after a hare, which flees towards a net, behind which a hunter (the λίνόπτης) crouches to left; he is nude and beardless, with drapery over right arm and a stick in left hand.Outer frieze: Crow (?) and fox confronted (twice repeated); similar bird to right with wings extended (the heads of this and the first bird are obliterated); snake to right, scorpion to left, and snake to left. In the field, imitation inscriptions.
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Phiale

c.500-470 BC

Attic 

Two friezes, the inner one representing a hare-hunt: Four hounds running at full speed to right after a hare, which flees towards a net, behind which a hunter (the λίνόπτης) crouches to left; he is nude and beardless, with drapery over right arm and a stick in left hand.
Outer frieze: Crow (?) and fox confronted (twice repeated); similar bird to right with wings extended (the heads of this and the first bird are obliterated); snake to right, scorpion to left, and snake to left. In the field, imitation inscriptions.

(Source: The British Museum)

italdred:

Basilica di Teodorico a Ravenna (by Alessandro Masia)

italdred:

Basilica di Teodorico a Ravenna (by Alessandro Masia)

(Source: italdred, via caravaggista)

ancientart:

More than meets the eye
To some this may appear to be no more than a common stone; in actual fact, it is an Acheulean hand axe dating to between 500,000 and 300,000 years before present. This particular biface was found at Saint Acheul, Amiens, Somme, France. 
Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Muséum de Toulouse, France. Photo taken by Didier Descouens.

ancientart:

More than meets the eye

To some this may appear to be no more than a common stone; in actual fact, it is an Acheulean hand axe dating to between 500,000 and 300,000 years before present. This particular biface was found at Saint Acheul, Amiens, Somme, France. 

Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Muséum de Toulouse, France. Photo taken by Didier Descouens.

(via mirousworlds)

erikkwakkel:

Page in bloom
A herbary is a book on plants. I always thought that such books contained drawings or paintings of plants. Until I came across this object on the website of the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Constructed around 1595, it is likely the oldest of its kind from England. The book is filled with about 300 real plants, which were gathered in Italy by a monk called Gregorio Reggio. Short descriptions accompany the specimens, which look like they were picked yesterday. Every page forever in bloom.
Pic: Bodleian Library. More on herbaries with real plants here.

erikkwakkel:

Page in bloom

A herbary is a book on plants. I always thought that such books contained drawings or paintings of plants. Until I came across this object on the website of the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Constructed around 1595, it is likely the oldest of its kind from England. The book is filled with about 300 real plants, which were gathered in Italy by a monk called Gregorio Reggio. Short descriptions accompany the specimens, which look like they were picked yesterday. Every page forever in bloom.

Pic: Bodleian Library. More on herbaries with real plants here.